Events: SpiritHorse Special Olympics and Veteran’s Children’s Day

News: Update Your Favorites

We recently received an updated set of criteria for IC3 (Intensive Customized Care Coordination) from DBHDD (Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities) , which required us to make some changes to the Pre-Referral Questionnaire for ages 6-21. This new set of criteria not only decreased the complexity of qualification, but it also increased the number of ways a child/youth may qualify for CME services.

It is important that referring parties use the newest form, which can be found at https://goo.gl/VXiLQ9, to prevent youth who do meet criteria from being screened out prematurely and decrease chances a referral will be delayed/denied due to being incomplete. If you have this form saved as a favorite in your browser, please delete the old form and save the new one.

Resource: Pathways Transition Programs Expands to New Counties

Staff at Pathways Transition Programs recently shared they have extended coverage area to provide IFI (Intensive Family Intervention) services in Bartow, Cobb, and Paulding Counties.

In their brochure, Pathways explains IFI as an intensive, family-based therapy which is designed for children and families undergoing prolonged periods of distress or crisis. The provide the service in the home and work with the family to strengthen and stabilize the family system and home environment. This not only supports the family in finding a balance in recovery, but also decreases the need for hospitalization or other out of home placements. IFI also supports children and families in transitioning from back to the home after being in a higher level of care. Staff assist the family to gain an enhanced perspective and understanding of the child’s emotional needs and enhance their ability to manage problematic behaviors while promoting self-control and family communication.

Please see the referral form below for details on how you can refer a family for services.

 

Resource: Gilmer Home Again Accepting Referrals

From Highland Rivers Health

The Gilmer Home Again Program is staffed and ready to begin taking referrals.

As a reminder, the Home Again program is a two week, intensive out-patient program that is designed to help avert crises and keep children from having to be removed from their homes.  This program can also be tailored to the family that is working to transition children back into their homes, after being in foster care, for example.  For those referred, we will be designing treatment plans that will allow for children and families to be seen in school, at home, and at our facility at 1950 Old Pleasant Valley Road, Talking Rock.

Home Again provides Individual and Family Counseling, both for the youth and for the family.  Family members will be assessed for substance use and mental health barriers and then provided with treatment as needed.  Parents will also be assessed and provided with parenting skills classes, as needed. Families will learn where to get help with other things like food, housing, transportation, child care, utility bills, etc.  Of course all problems will not be resolved in the two weeks families work with Home Again, so at the end of the two weeks, families are referred out for any ongoing services that might be needed.

Gilmer Home Again is located at 1950 Old Pleasant Valley Drive, Talking Rock, downstairs from Kids Kottage.  We can be reached at 706-276-3610.  Attached you will find our referral form.  This form can be completed and emailed to me.  I will personally be following up with all referrals within one business day of receiving it.  If you are unable to email this form to me, please call the number to Home Again (above) and we will get the necessary information from you.

If you would like to schedule a presentation to your group or have questions about the Home Again program, please contact:

Melissa R. Dempsey, MSW, S/T
Highland Rivers Health
Gilmer Home Again Out Patient
Office: 706-635-2739 ext 115
melissadempsey@highlandrivers.org
www.highlandrivers.org

Webinar: Navigating School and Work with a Serious Mental Health Condition

Announcement from Transitions RTC:

Navigating School and Work with a Serious Mental Health Condition:
It Can Be a Bumpy Ride

Thursday, September 14, 2017
12:00 - 1:00 PM EDT

Young adults with serious mental health conditions (SMHC) face delays in participating or are prevented from participating in settings where career development and exploration activities typically occur. Little is still known about how young adults navigate these activities while also managing a SMHC.

In this webinar, you'll hear about experiences of young adults with SMHC as they learn how to navigate life, including their success and challenges with educational and employment activities. 

The young people with SMHC featured in this webinar provide retrospectives of a) their education, training, and employment experiences, b) how those activities developed over time, and c) how contextual life circumstances (e.g., family history, experiences with SMHC) and pivotal life events (e.g., hospitalization) may have influenced these activities.

Join Transitions RTC's Kathryn Sabella, Laura Golden, and Emma Pici D'Ottavio for this insightful and informative webinar! 

Resource: Support After Irma

Storms and natural disasters can have a profound impact on our emotional well-being, and it is natural to feel a range of emotions, from stress to anxiety or depression, after the event is over. For many, these feelings of distress are short-term and will resolve over time. However, for others, especially children and young people, these feelings could last longer and have an impact on their relationships with others, school, work, and other aspects of daily life.

Talking with someone about these feelings can often help speed the recovery process and reduce feelings of isolation and loneliness. The trained counselors at Disaster Distress Helpline provide 24/7, year-round crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters.

If you or someone you love is experiencing signs of distress,
call the Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990.

Media: The Be Vocal Documentary

At times, it can be difficult to talk about mental health, especially if you are someone living with or love a person with a mental illness.  We fear that accepting a diagnosis or speaking about mental illness will limit our options in life, we worry what others thing, and and we secretly fear that if we “give in,” to the belief that we have an illness, we give up.

The Be Vocal Documentary challenges us to look at mental illness differently. Through personal stories, we are asked to see and understand that opening up about mental health invites healing and creates opportunities. It encourages us to speak up about mental health so we can find freedom through the sharing of our stories.

Click here to watch the full documentary and stay to see how you can Be Vocal.

New Resource: College and Your Mental Health

An estimated 2.2 million high school students will begin college each fall, and while this school year is just beginning it’s not too early or too late for students and parents to discuss the college transition.

With new-found independence, social relationships, and exploration of a new world, this transition can be an exciting time for most.  However, with all these new experiences can come the challenges of increased stress, isolation, and separation from the support systems of family and friends back home. This time of transition can be difficult for students, and it can trigger emotional or mental health crises. Without strong supports, some students may experience bouts of severe depression, anxiety, panic attacks, suicidal thoughts, or other symptoms.

NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) and The Jed Foundation recognize the challenges that this time presents for families and students.  For this reason, they partnered to develop a new guide to help students and parents prepare for the transition to college and ensure a plan is in place in the event of an emotional crisis.

TIME also published a story demonstrating the importance of this conversation. The article, titled, “Why College Is a Risky Time for Student’s Mental Health,” shares how access to information and coordinating support after a mental health crisis can be especially difficult for families of students.  Using the new guide, families can plan for some of the common pitfalls, such as sharing of personal health information, grades, and school incidents, which can be critical in recognizing a possible crisis and coordinating treatment.

While some students may never experience a severe crisis, it never hurts to be prepared as the information could also help a friend or classmate through a difficult time.